Gold Panda-Half of Where You Live (Full Album Stream)

Gold-Panda-Brazil
With just over a week until the album officially hits retail, Gold Panda lets the entire LP go for some free pre-purchase streaming. It’s always a sign of confidence in an artist’s work when they do such a thing, and I’ve got little doubt that confidence is going to be fully justified.

11 tracks made the cut, including the previously-released Brazil and We Work Nights, and as if this full stream weren’t enough, he’s also been kind enough to throw forth a video for My Father In Hong Kong 1961 (which is of course, also on the album). The latter continues the international vibe Gold Panda seems to be aiming for with this project, and is an incredibly fascinating watch, purely for its simple yet captivating portrayal of everyday life and scenery in the region, and comes ably backed by an Eastern-inspired production of an atmospheric nature. Watch that here, and stream the album below; don’t forget to buy it next week on the 11th too.

Gold Panda-Half of Where You Live (Stream)

Share this post or we'll inflict pain on you.

Gold Panda-We Work Nights

Gold-Panda-Brazil
Next month is not one to miss in music, it seems. Gold Panda’s Half of Where You Live lands on 10th June, and ahead of that release he lets another single go, and it’s another with plenty of international influence.

This one packs in a huge range of layers in the production, from sharp, piercing mandolin through to the pillowy percussion, and not forgetting the atmospheric synths that lie between them. There’s plenty more, and it’s a typically-detailed effort from Gold Panda that doesn’t merely throw them all in a heap, but rather lays them out intricately into a piece that moves very organically; there are one or two brief periods of downtime that serve as nice recovery points, swallowing up the lively, vibrant production that precedes them before it becomes overbearing, and gently bringing the listener back around to another dose of the high-pitched melodies. Aside from those brief turns, the more energetic aspects of the production evolve well throughout the track, with the first half centred more around the thick percussion and guitar strums, before the mandolin enters the fray to really command the second half of the piece. It’s a great release from Gold Panda, and makes for a strong sign ahead of the album release in a couple of weeks.

Share this post or we'll inflict pain on you.

Gold Panda-Brazil

Gold-Panda-Brazil
Not only did he recently spend time in Brazil, but he tipped me off about this track. What a guy.

After releasing the Trust EP a few months back, he of bear-like appearance is gearing up for the release of his sophomore LP, Half of Where You Live, set to land on 10th June. Unlike his previous electro-heavy works, this is far more rooted in traditional instrumentation, with the first third almost entirely held together with traditional-style percussion and only a light dash of synth. The track progresses with a hypnotising vocal sample and more prominent electronic influences, as distortions and additional samples make their way in, before a brief lull takes place, and finally the track closes with a shrill melody and wind chime-like effects to end with a touch of positivity.

It’s a warm instrumental that weaves near-tribal sounds into a modern electronic piece, and does so without compromising the inherent charisma and familiarity of using traditional instrumentation. Pre-order that album below.

Share this post or we'll inflict pain on you.

Gold Panda-Trust EP

Over the last few months I’ve taken a huge liking to Gold Panda’s music (thanks Ed), and having ridiculously overplayed his entire back catalogue, this brand new 4-track EP comes as a lovely surprise.

If you’re a fan of the various Clams Casino instrumental tapes, you’ll definitely enjoy this. It’s rather more reserved and darker than his previous works, and given the conditions outside it’s a change that’s welcomed, and one that he pulls off with in typically skilful fashion. The component parts of the beats seem to range from unusual background noises (pretty sure I heard a car door shut in track 2) to atmospheric synths and luscious layers of percussion, with each track packaging everything up into a wonderfully cohesive piece of music.

The EP’s sequenced nicely, as the final two tracks add progressive touches of positivty, though still contained within the slightly downcast soundscape of those before them, and this is a collection of instrumentals that will make a great addition to your library; be sure to buy the set.

Share this post or we'll inflict pain on you.